Assuring Quality in Higher Education – a Global CONCEPT

Dzień dobry JAKOŚCIOWCY :-)
Z kim i gdzie mam się podzielić jak nie z Wami i tu?
Właśnie pracuję nad charakterystyką, opisem prezentacji pt.: “Assuring Quality in Higher Education – a Global CONCEPT“. Do niedzieli mam czas, żeby “sabmytować propozal” i potencjalnie zaprezentować pomysł przed liderami tego świata tutaj.

Cóż… Proszę trzymajcie kciuki! :-)

Hello World,
Whom and where should I share this to, if not with you and here?
I’m now working on a description of the presentation proposal entitled ‘Assuring Quality in Higher Education – a Global Concept’. I need to have this ready by Sunday to potentially present my idea to the leaders of this planet. Here are the details of the event.

Well…, keep your fingers crossed, please! :-)

Assuring Quality in Higher Education

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Drukuj
  • PDF

Leave a Comment

Filed under Accreditation, Mea Universitas, Performance, Quality

Życie po życiu

W ciągu ostatnich paru lat, może nawet dekad, było tak, że wieczorami rozmyślałem. I akurat ten fragment nie różni się specjalnie od teraźniejszości. Niemniej jednak, rozmyślałem w kategoriach “muszę coś zrobić”, planowałem, obiecywałem sam sobie – co muszę a czego nie mogę.

Byłem tym samym człowiekiem, a jednak coś się zmieniło… Misja się nie zmieniła. Pragnienia i poczucie wszechogarniającej potrzeby bycia użytecznie społecznie też nie. A jednak… uważam, że niczego nie muszę. Taka postawa od paru tygodni, może miesięcy, a może nawet roku bardzo ułatwia mi koegzystencję z otaczającym mnie światem.

Czuję się sobą i wiem, że będąc sobą mogę więcej niż kiedykolwiek.
Oby to życie po życiu trwało jak najdłużej.

Dobranoc (odpowiedziałem mojej żonie Ani)

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Drukuj
  • PDF

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Accreditation – is it a threshold to maintain minimum standards or a starting block for quality improvement?

I was trying to answer the above question during my presentation at the 4th QS-Maple Conference held in Abu Dhabi this year. The main point I stressed was about a period of time between accreditation and re-accreditation referred as an accreditation cycle.

I have no doubt how important role accreditation plays when it comes to assuring an acceptable and minimum level of quality. It is very much visible in the national accreditation systems whereby all higher education institutions in a given country are expected to adhere to local requirements. I call it Mc-reditation, meaning that all experience the same – minimum and acceptable level of quality for a long period of time and regardless of the delivery site. And don’t get me wrong – I find it very positive (at least as something to begin with). Nevertheless, I strongly believe we are here for more – to aim for some sort of continuity in quality improvement.

Except for meeting the minimum standards, and therefore improving at the initial stage of the accreditation process, does accreditation really make us strive for excellence?
I don’t think so. I dont’t think we can rely on the accreditation standards nor accreditation procedure in this matter. It rather depends on our quality culture – the maturity of our quality management system…

For more information, please refer to my presentation here.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Drukuj
  • PDF

Comments Off on Accreditation – is it a threshold to maintain minimum standards or a starting block for quality improvement?

Filed under Accreditation

McDefinition of Quality

In a few days I’m starting to teach my next Total Quality Management class at the Bachelor level. As it happens every semester, first I need to make my students think what quality in fact means.
What is it? How to define it? What is this “thing” which they are supposed to know how to manage and improve?

Often I start my talks on quality with a description which basically says that quality is simply indefinable – it’s like love*. “Everybody knows and feels when there is love. Everybody recognises it. But when we try to give a definition of it, we are left standing with empty hands” (Vroeijenstijn, 1995).

20130905-170046.jpgIn 1997 I went with my friends to Croatia. We were driving from Poland and back. We didn’t have enough money to be able to afford everything we wanted. At the same time we wanted to have fun. Such a dilemma made us choose between different options of our diet. The main component of it happened to be a watermelon. These were very cheap comparing to everything else. Nevertheless, after a week of our holidays, we basically were starving, lacking a concrete food.

We started our return trip to Poland. I can remember it was heavily raining when we reached the outskirts of Zagreb. Suddenly we saw it – a big billboard, informing that there would be McDonald’s only a few kilometers ahead. All of us were so excited. We started planning what we would eat at the venue. You probably know the McDonald’s menu. You can imagine what options we had. My friends and I, we all decided what we wanted, and at the same time – what we expected to have. We arrived, we ordered what we had planned to eat, we ate it, and guess what happened next?
We were extremely happy! Our expectations were met.

The point is that it doesn’t matter where you order your McRoyal, whether it is Zagreb, Warsaw or Fujairah. It always tastes the same. Genichi Taguchi would say that this is a “uniformity around a target value”. I’m saying, if you want to reach such a state of quality, you need to be aware of different kinds of requirements, standards, procedures, approaches… You’ll have your high quality McRoyal, meaning a consistent quality of your product or service, only if you know what you are doing and what the measurable standards are. Once you know that, you can manage quality since quality is a result – the result of being aware!

If you think I’m saying that McDonald’s offers higher quality food or is of higher quality than your favorite restaurant, you didn’t understand what I had to say.

*Note: there are circumstances under which you must not start your lecture in this particular way.

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Drukuj
  • PDF

Comments Off on McDefinition of Quality

Filed under Just thoughts / Wolne myśli, Quality

Accreditation: a pessimistic reality or an idealistic hope?

Yesterday I finished my part of the self-assessment report. The goal has been very clear from the very beginning – to get an institutional accreditation.
WritingAfter a few weeks of gathering evidence I was able to write something up about the entire institution. I was (I guess I still am) responsible for Standard 10 – Community Engagement of the Standards for Licensure and Accreditation of Technical and Vocational Education and Training published by the Commission for Academic Accreditation (CAA).

As usual, it was an interesting experience. The way people understand evidence, self-assessment process and accreditation itself varies a lot. I admit, sometimes it’s quite amusing.
I’m a big fan of treating accreditation experience (especially the self-assessment process) as a bottomless well with enduring opportunities for quality improvement. To me – this is actually where everything begins – everything what’s the most exciting and meaningful when it comes to managing quality in higher education. However, in reality, does it really mean the same to the vast majority of those involved? Is accreditation a threshold to maintain minimum standards or a starting block for quality to be improved?

Accreditation means something different to various groups of stakeholders. To potential students it supposedly means the guarantee that an academic program, in this case an institution as a whole, meets minimum quality requirements, increasing their chances on the labor market. To government it means the accountability in spending public money.
What about the perspective of a higher education institution? Is accreditation more a static obligation “imposed” externally or a viable and dynamic quality improvement tool? I wish it was the second option, and I believe there is space to understand it in such a way…

Don’t you think that a common perspective and practice is a bit less idealistic?

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Drukuj
  • PDF

Comments Off on Accreditation: a pessimistic reality or an idealistic hope?

Filed under Accreditation